• Micro and Nano Technology Conference in Medicine

  • Hilton Waikoloa Village, Waikoloa, Hawaii

Biomedical grand challenges facing our society can be addressed at the scale of biology with Micro and Nanoscale technologies. These technologies hold great potential for diagnostics, therapeutics, enhancement of physiological function, disease management, or early monitoring and prevention. IEEE EMBS is sponsoring the third biennial Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology in Medicine to foster interaction between scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs and medical researchers in the context of real-world medical needs and issues. The Conference will promote vigorous and open dialogue towards groundbreaking solutions to previously unaddressed problems and cutting edge technologies for faster, more quantitative, and less expensive biomedical solutions using advances in Micro and Nanotechnology. 

Trailblazer Award

Prof. John Rogers is the recipient of the Trailblazer Award, recognizing his contributions to wearable sensing approaches to monitor physiology and quantify disease. Dr. Rogers will be recognized for the award at a ceremony during the IEEE EMBS Micro & Nanotechnology in Medicine Conference in December. Previous recipients include Prof. Mehmet Toner, of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, and Prof. Stephen Quake of Stanford University.

Professor John A. Rogers obtained BA and BS degrees in chemistry and in physics from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1989.  From MIT, he received SM degrees in physics and in chemistry in 1992 and the PhD degree in physical chemistry in 1995.  From 1995 to 1997, Rogers was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard University Society of Fellows.  He joined Bell Laboratories as a Member of Technical Staff in the Condensed Matter Physics Research Department in 1997, and served as Director of this department from the end of 2000 to 2002.  He then spent thirteen years on the faculty at University of Illinois, most recently as the Swanlund Chair Professor and Director of the Seitz Materials Research Laboratory.  In 2016, he joined Northwestern University as the Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Chemistry and Neurological Surgery, where he is also the founding Director of the newly endowed Center on Bio-Integrated Electronics.  His research has been recognized by many awards including a MacArthur Fellowship (2009), the Lemelson-MIT Prize (2011), the MRS Mid-Career Researcher Award (2013), the Smithsonian Award for American Ingenuity in the Physical Sciences (2013), the ETH Zurich Chemical Engineering Medal (2015) and many others.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.