Speakers

Plenary Speakers

Donald E. Ingber, Ph.D. – Wyss Institute Founding Director and Core Faculty Member, Platform Leader, Biomimetic Microsystems, Judah Folkman Professorship of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital

Donald E. Ingber, Ph.D

Donald E. Ingber, Ph.D

Wyss Institute Founding Director and Core Faculty Member, Platform Leader, Biomimetic Microsystems, Judah Folkman Professorship of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital

Don is Founding Director of the Wyss Institute and a leader in the emerging field of biologically inspired engineering. He oversees a multifaceted effort to identify the mechanisms that living organisms use to self-assemble and to apply these design principles to develop advanced materials and devices. Within this overall effort, he also leads the Biomimetic Microsystems platform in which microfabrication techniques from the computer industry are used to build functional circuits with living cells as components. His most recent innovation is a technology for building tiny, complex, three-dimensional models of human organs. These “organs on chips” mimic complicated human functions, providing critical information for diagnostic and therapeutic applications more reliably and at a fraction of the cost and resources associated with traditional drug-testing methods. Don has made major con-tributions to cell and tissue engineering, angiogenesis and cancer research, systems biology, and na-nobiotechnology. He was the first researcher to recognize that tensegrity architecture (in which a system stabilizes itself mechanically by balancing local compression with continuous tension) is a fun-damental principle in the way living organisms are structured at the nanometer scale.

Don has authored more than 325 publications and 70 patents and has received numerous distinctions including the Holst Medal, Pritzker Award from the Biomedical Engineering Society, Rous-Whipple Award from the American Society for Investigative Pathology, Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of In Vitro Biology, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Innovator Award. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and serves on the Board of Directors of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute. Ingber also holds the Judah Folkman Professorship of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital and is a Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

John A. Rogers, Ph.D. – Lee J. Flory Founder Chair in Engineering Innovation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Chemistry, Director, F. Seitz Materials Research Laboratory

John A. Rogers, Ph.D.

John A. Rogers, Ph.D

Lee J. Flory Founder Chair in Engineering Innovation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Chemistry, Director, F. Seitz Materials Research Laboratory

Professor John A. Rogers obtained BA and BS degrees in chemistry and in physics from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1989. From MIT, he received SM degrees in physics and in chemistry in 1992 and the PhD degree in physical chemistry in 1995. From 1995 to 1997, Rogers was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard University Society of Fellows. He joined Bell Laboratories as a Member of Technical Staff in the Condensed Matter Physics Research Department in 1997, and served as Director of this department from the end of 2000 to 2002. He is now the Lee J. Flory-Founder Chair in Engineering at University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign with a primary appointment in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

Rogers’ research includes fundamental and applied aspects of materials and patterning techniques for unusual electronic and photonic devices, with an emphasis on bio-integrated and bio-inspired systems. He has published more than 350 papers and is inventor on more than 80 patents, more than 50 of which are licensed or in active use. Rogers is a Fellow of the IEEE, APS, MRS and AAAS, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His research has been recognized with many awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship in 2009 and the Lemelson-MIT Prize in 2011.

Stephen Quake, Ph.D. – Professor of Bioengineering and of Applied Physics at Stanford University

Stephen Quake, Ph.D.

Stephen Quake, Ph.D.

Professor of Bioengineering and of Applied Physics at Stanford University

Stephen Quake, D.Phil., is a Professor of Bioengineering and of Applied Physics at Stanford University. He pioneered the development of Microfluidic Large Scale Integration (LSI), demonstrating the first integrated microfluidic devices with thousands of mechanical valves. This technology is helping to pave the way for automation of biology at the nanoliter scale, and in recent years Quake and his collaborators have used it for applications as diverse as discovering a new drug for hepatitis C, mapping the genomes of environmental microbes, and measuring gene expression in individual cancer stem cells. Commercial versions of microfluidic LSI are now used in hundreds of laboratories around the world for diverse purposes.

Quake demonstrated the first successful single molecule DNA sequencing technology, which has been commercially developed and is a leading candidate to deliver the first $1,000 genome. In 2009 he and two co-workers sequenced his genome using the commercial version of the single molecule sequencing technology that he developed, an event that was widely reported in the popular press. In addition to his work at Stanford, he is a cofounder of both Helicos Biosciences and Fluidigm Corporation. In 2002, he was named as one of the Technology Review’s TR35. In 2004, he was the recipient of the NIH Di-rector’s Pioneer Award. He is the 2012 winner of the Lemelson–MIT Prize.

Belinda Seto, Ph.D. – Deputy Director – National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institute of Health

Belinda Seto, Ph.D.

Belinda Seto, Ph.D.

Deputy Director – National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institute of Health

Belinda Seto, Ph.D. is the Deputy Director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). She is responsible for the governance and management of all facets of the Institute, including strategic planning for research and training programs, budget planning, financial management, communications, and staffing. She has launched major initiatives in developing technologies to achieve health equity in the under-served populations, and policies to promote strategic partnerships with stakeholders. She played a key role in promoting the synergy between molecular biology and imaging and bioengineering research. She chairs the NIH working group on women and bioengineering to increase the number of women and enhance their careers in bioengineering. As such, she is a strong advocate for the next generation of biomedical researchers.

Prior to joining the NIBIB, Dr. Seto was the Acting Deputy Director for Extramural Research at the NIH. She led the Office of Extramural Research, which is the focal point for NIH policies and guidelines for research administration. Dr. Seto has a wealth of experience in the health policy arena, particularly AIDS policies. She also directed minority health programs in the areas of infant mortality and behavioral interventions research.

Dr. Seto earned her Ph.D. in biochemistry at Purdue University. Following postdoctoral training at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, she joined the Food and Drug Administration where she conducted research in virology for nearly 10 years. She has received numerous awards for her research, including the Distinguished Alumni Award for Science from Purdue University, the DHHS Secretary’s Award for Exceptional Achievement, Inventor’s Awards, NIH Director’s awards and she is listed in the American Men and Women of Science. For her leadership, skill and dedication to mentoring, she was awarded the Ruth L. Kirschstein Mentoring Award by the NIH Director.

Dr. Seto serves on numerous Federal and professional organizations committees, as well as being a member of several professional societies. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

Mehmet Toner, Ph.D. – Helen Andrus Benedict Professor of Surgery (Biomedical Engineering), and Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital

Mehmet Toner, Ph.D.

Mehmet Toner, Ph.D.

Helen Andrus Benedict Professor of Surgery (Biomedical Engineering), and Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital

Mehmet Toner, Ph.D., has a joint appointment as professor of surgery and health sciences and technology at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital. He serves as a member of the senior scientific staff at the Shriners Hospital for Children and is co-founder of the Center for Engineering in Medicine. Toner is founder of the NIH BioMicroElectroMechanical Systems Resource Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he is also director of the Biomedical Engineering Research and Education Program for physicians.

Toner received a Bachelor of Science degree from Istanbul Technical University in 1983 and a Master of Science degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1985, both in mechanical engineering. He completed his doctorate in medical engineering at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology in 1989. He joined the faculty at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School as an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in 1989, and was promoted to associate professor in 1996 and to professor in 2002.

In 1994, he was recognized with the YC Fung Faculty Award in Bioengineering from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In 1995, he received the Whitaker Foundation Special Opportunity Award. In 1997, he won the John F. and Virginia B. Taplin Faculty Fellow Award given by Harvard and MIT. Toner is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He serves on the scientific advisory boards of multiple biotechnology and medical device companies.

Toner is internationally recognized for his multidisciplinary approach to biomedical problems in the areas of low-temperature biology and biostabilization, tissue engineering and artificial organs, and microsystems bioengineering in clinical medicine and biology. He has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Whitaker Foundation, National Textile Center, and others. He has published more than 200 scientific publications and has delivered more than 350 scientific presentations.

Confirmed Invited Speakers